shoulders

4 Squat Variations You Should Be Using If You Lack Mobility

4 Squat Variations You Should Be Using If You Lack Mobility

The ability to squat is one of the most basic human movements. Unfortunately as we age, experience injury, and spend long periods of time sitting at desks and in the car our body loses the valuable mobility that it once had. Loss of mobility in our hips, spine, shoulders, or ankles can make the back squat a difficult and awkward feeling exercise to perform. And despite all of these common mobility restrictions the back squat is one of the most frequently performed exercises in the gym.

Because a mobility restriction makes back squatting a higher risk exercise to perform does this mean that squatting is something you should be avoiding when in the gym? Not necessarily. Like most other exercises you can always make modifications in order to make it safer and more effective for you.

4 Easy Steps For Improving Thoracic Rotation

4 Easy Steps For Improving Thoracic Rotation

Most of us live in a world where our daily routines involve hours spent in front of a screen, in a car, or on a couch. As the hours you spend sitting accumulate, it’s likely the mobility of your hips, spine, and shoulders will begin to decrease. However, most of us may not see the negative effects of this decreased range of motion until we ask our body to perform an activity that challenges these ranges.

For example, let’s say you used to be a great baseball player in high school and golfed every summer with your buddies. Flash forward years from then and now all of the time you’ve spent at your desk has caused your shoulders to get tight and you no longer have the range of motion you once had. Your golf swing just doesn’t feel right, and throwing a round of batting practice leaves your shoulder feeling sore for days.

In this article we’ll cover four simple steps for how you can improve your thoracic mobility, which will allow your shoulders to feel looser, neck to feel better, and rotational activities like golf, baseball, and tennis feel easier.

How to Keep Your Shoulders Healthy When Bench Pressing

How to Keep Your Shoulders Healthy When Bench Pressing

Bench pressing is a staple in most fitness enthusiasts’ exercise programs. It’s likely that your first experience in the gym was a chest day, and ever since that, you’ve continually chased the feeling of your first chest pump. For that reason, along with its association with bodybuilding greats and its place in power lifting competitions, the barbell bench press will never go extinct. Nor should it; it’s a great way to put on size and gain strength in your upper body. But, before embarking on any bench pressing journey, you need to consider your risk:reward ratio and ensure that you’ve bullet proofed your shoulders to handle the demands of barbell benching.

How to Warm-Up Properly

How to Warm-Up Properly

A well-thought-out and well-executed warm-up is an important component of an exercise program that is often neglected without much deliberation. We’ve all been there before, pressed for time and wanting to get in a great workout. It’s easy to walk past the foam rollers, pretend stretching doesn’t exist, and step into the squat rack, grab the dumbbells, or press the power button on the treadmill.  We usually do this for one of three reasons: