hips

4 Squat Variations You Should Be Using If You Lack Mobility

4 Squat Variations You Should Be Using If You Lack Mobility

The ability to squat is one of the most basic human movements. Unfortunately as we age, experience injury, and spend long periods of time sitting at desks and in the car our body loses the valuable mobility that it once had. Loss of mobility in our hips, spine, shoulders, or ankles can make the back squat a difficult and awkward feeling exercise to perform. And despite all of these common mobility restrictions the back squat is one of the most frequently performed exercises in the gym.

Because a mobility restriction makes back squatting a higher risk exercise to perform does this mean that squatting is something you should be avoiding when in the gym? Not necessarily. Like most other exercises you can always make modifications in order to make it safer and more effective for you.

The Art Of Foam Rolling

The Art Of Foam Rolling

I’m no fortuneteller, but I’m usually pretty good at predicting the first few moves people make when they enter the gym.  Somewhere between setting down their bag, consuming a healthy dose of caffeine, and loading up the barbell there’s some vaguely defined—albeit well-intentioned—period of time that involves rolling around on a foam roller or digging a lacrosse ball into various body parts.

These types of soft-tissue mobilization techniques have become a standard part of most people’s warm-up routines.  But what do we really know about the science underlying these methods?  And more importantly, are they right for everyone?

Wouldn’t it be great if we had a purpose and a plan, and not just a bunch of haphazard “I-think-this-is-supposed-to-be-good-for-me” exercises?

This article will explore some of what we know about the science of muscle and fascia, and how we can connect that information to our workouts for the best possible outcomes. 

The Truth About Sitting

The Truth About Sitting

Sitting is inevitable; most of us do it at work, then we sit on the car ride home, and then do it again while watching TV at the end of the day. When your day is made up of mostly sitting and you also lack movement and exercise in your daily routine you’ll notice that your body feels tired, lethargic, and tight.

In this post you will learn: what it is about sitting that can be problematic, how to alleviate pain that can be associated with prolonged sitting, and long term solutions to combat sitting related problems.

How to Warm-Up Properly

How to Warm-Up Properly

A well-thought-out and well-executed warm-up is an important component of an exercise program that is often neglected without much deliberation. We’ve all been there before, pressed for time and wanting to get in a great workout. It’s easy to walk past the foam rollers, pretend stretching doesn’t exist, and step into the squat rack, grab the dumbbells, or press the power button on the treadmill.  We usually do this for one of three reasons: